GOSHEN -

Tuesday's special election in Goshen will determine if the school district can go ahead with a $17 million expansion and renovation project. 

It would center around work at the high school and middle school.

Some say it needs to happen to keep Goshen schools up-to-date, while others insist the plan is too expensive.

If you look around Goshen, you will find signs in yards around the city planted by a group in favor of passing the $17 million bond issue.

$10 million of that would go towards a new swimming pool to replace two aging pools.

The remainder, among other things, would add space for the music programs at both the middle and high schools as well as add more classroom space for instructional and physical education programs.

"We firmly believe that this is in the best interest of the community," said Goshen Assistant Superintendent Bob Evans. "If you are looking toward the future of Goshen, this is a good opportunity for us to continue to put forth a good school system that everyone can benefit from."

WSBT spoke to a number of people on and off camera about the referendum. Some felt the proposed building project should go through. Others, though, were concerned about the cost taxpayers would shoulder if it passed.

"Anything that we can do to make the city more attractive I think is a good idea, at least to consider making the school system a better place for the kids," said Nathan Butler, who supports the bond issue. 

"I worked in the schools as a speech therapist and worked at Goshen High School, and I saw how crowded it was," added JoEllen Bernstein.

Some people, like those at Scott's Barbershop, are opposed.

"I am basically against it, because number one, I don't want my taxes to increase," said Jim Coble.

"I have a lot of senior citizens, and the majority of them are against the project," noted Paul Scott. "I am hearing from people that they don't want to pay more on taxes, because I know some of them are really struggling the way it is."

Only Goshen precincts 1 through 21 will vote on the school funding referendum on Tuesday.

In Indiana, polls will be open Tuesday from 6 a.m. until 6 p.m.